Optimal Exercise Type


Optimal Exercise Type

It is well known that frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits on health and weight control. In an increasing epidemic of obesity, it is useful to understand which type of exercise can be most effective for you based on your genes and then tailor your exercise routine accordingly.

Around 20 years ago, the ACE gene became the first genetic component that was shown to significantly impact human physical performance. It has now been found that it also informs an individual what exercise is most suitable for your body and how best to lose weight based on your genes.

What is the ACE gene?

The ACE gene produces an enzyme that converts the inactive Angiotensin I to the active Angiotensin II, which results in a narrowing of blood vessels.

What is the effect of genetic variation at the ACE gene?

Genetic variation at the ACE genotype is associated with overall physical performance ability.| In cardiac muscle, ACE genotype has associations with left ventricular mass changes in response to stimulus. Specifically, an insertion - the addition of a nucleotide base at the ACE gene - lowers ACE activity and results in a lower cardiac growth response to exercise. Additionally, individuals with an insertion have an increased level of glucose metabolism after intense exercise and therefore aerobic exercise can improve weight loss in these individuals.

A deletion - the loss of a nucleotide base at the ACE gene - is associated with higher ACE activity and an exaggerated cardiac growth response to training. Consequently, an insertion is associated with improvement in endurance sports and a deletion is associated with sports requiring sprinting or short bursts of power.

How is the ACE gene linked to weight loss?

Individuals with an insertion have an increased level of glucose metabolism after intense exercise and therefore aerobic exercise can improve weight loss in these individuals.

Backed by Science

Our in-house scientists have sorted through thousands of studies and we only use genes that are backed by a significant body of peer-reviewed research. Check out Nell’s Science Standard for more information.